Millennial medium chill: What the screwed generation can teach us about happiness

I always love a good perspective on the Millennial generation, especially when it’s written from a Millennial perspective. There are a number of studies, articles and other points of view from people like me who take an active interest in the culture and sociology of this generation that currently represents everyone from teenagers to those in their early thirties. This piece comments on a number of them. I’m particularly excited about the Millennial Geography project they mention and will likely use it as a data set in my ongoing research on Millennials from a consumer culture perspective.
I will say that this author is a big more contrary than most in that she presumes those of us who are actively seeking to understand this generation are misguided or still hanging on to stereotypes. . But on a positive note, it brings up a lot of points that at least affirm my perspective on cultural themes I have observed and used to educate my clients on how to engage and empower this generation poised to change the world! 🙂

Grist

About a year ago, during a cross-faded conversation that felt profound but probably sounded more like this, a friend told me about Strauss-Howe generational theory, a scholarly take on the somewhat narcissistic assumption that each generation has a signature personality that leaves a unique mark on world culture and history. Strauss and Howe identify four archetypes — prophets, nomads, heroes, or artists — that can define an entire generation based on the societal conditions they grew up in.

Humblebrag alert: Millennials comprise a Hero Generation. This means we were born “during a time of individual pragmatism, self-reliance, and laissez faire” (in other words, the Reagan/Bush Sr./Clinton years) and are coming of age “as team-oriented young optimists during a Crisis.” If that all sounds too conveniently perfect, remember that Strauss and Howe came up with this back in 1991, when Barack Obama was still fresh out of law school…

View original post 2,031 more words

Internetiquiette 101: Social Media Boundaries

I have to admit that being an active social media participant-observer is exhausting albeit gratifying work.  Being a good anthropologist and narcissist, I find myself frequently assessing my reactions others'  social media behavior as influenced by the collective of digital compatriots whom I also have occasion to see in real life from time to time. … Continue reading Internetiquiette 101: Social Media Boundaries

Is Instagram The Photographer’s Friend or Its Faux?

I love this perspective (see re-blog / link below)  from a photographer about Instagram and it's role as an anthropological and sociological exercise.  He doesn't label Instagrammers as "posers" like some more "serious" hipster photographers might.  Rather, he (or she?) points to the value it has in allowing us to share and bond over our … Continue reading Is Instagram The Photographer’s Friend or Its Faux?

Truth and Consequences: Social Media Is The New “Permanent Record”

Tomorrow I am going to be sitting on a panel for the marketing community in Toronto as an expert on "youth".  In perusing the subject matter on which I am to be prepared to comment, one particular category entitled: "techno-powered: speed of information / innovation, new forms of connectivity and values shifts" got me going … Continue reading Truth and Consequences: Social Media Is The New “Permanent Record”