Adulting: Because Being a Grownup Should Only Be a Temporary Affliction

I remember being a kid trying to figure out what set adults apart from the rest of the masses of "watery moles" (Thanks, Florence King,  for that reference I will be using often).  In my best estimation, they were bigger than kids, had breath that smelled like coffee, cigarettes, alcohol or artificial mint, drove unu … Continue reading Adulting: Because Being a Grownup Should Only Be a Temporary Affliction

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Love, Haters and Hipsters: The Irony of Being A Millennial

I have officially decided that I've  spent too much time commenting on a recent Facebook thread started in the last day  by fellow bloggers Eve Kerrigan, Rachel Gall and Anna Akbari, about a recent article on Millennials called  "Generation Wuss" by Vanity Fair's Bret Easton Ellis. I am, however, compelled to share and express my very "special" point … Continue reading Love, Haters and Hipsters: The Irony of Being A Millennial

Love: There’s an App for That #millennials

Some more perspective in Millennials and love from So-Called Millennial. I particularly appreciate the analysis on love and “risk”…

So-Called Millennial

Happy Valentines Day Art Print Image courtesy of Allison Johnson Creative

I thought the title of this post was rather clever, but upon googling it I found that The Bold Italic has already used it, so I thought I’d at least give them a shout-out. The tech panel event they hosted called “Love? There’s an App for That” has already passed, but if you’re located in the SF Bay Area check the other upcoming eventsThe Bold Italic will be hosting.

Alright let’s get down to business! I’ve been studying the many facets in which millennials demonstrate pragmatism and practicality, and I thought it would be interesting to examine how this trait influences their ideas of relationships. I know– love and practicality? They don’t seem to go together. And if you read on, that may be something millennials need to do some soul-searching about.

This week Time Magazine released an article called Millennials in Love:…

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Millennials in Love: Why They’re Not So Different From Their Parents After All

So excited to have gotten the call to participate in the dialogue in this article….

Ideas

There’s nothing quite like a new generation setting out to breed. It’s an exercise in feverishness and fretfulness, in urgency and appetite, a sweet and simpleminded leave-taking of the senses in the pursuit of, well, a lot. Sex, certainly—plenty of that. Then there’s companionship, and security and the esteem of your friends—to say nothing of yourself—and the basic thrill of thinking that maybe, just maybe, you’re in love. Only a handful of years earlier, the same demographic was nothing but a swarm of pre-sexual children. Then the mating software booted up, but it was constrained by bodies and minds way too young to do much about it. And to the extent that anyone tried, there were parents, teachers and society as a whole policing their behavior.

Then all at once the limits are gone—the young breeders jump the traces and are set free to have at it. Soon enough, their…

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The Loneliest Generation?

This article poses an interesting paradox: how is it that the most socially networked generation in history is also potentially the loneliest? I suppose the idea here is that in the era of being able to carefully curate your public facing identity we are missing the ability to make more intimate human connections and thus limiting our self actualization ability.
I am not sure I buy it – honestly. I think the social network environment actually opens up more opportunity for human intimacy – introducing us to people with similar ideas and ideas that we may never have met otherwise – allowing us to have friends wherever we go and thus giving us more possibilities to connect with one another and further our pursuit of “who am I and what am I doing here”.
Interested in thoughts out there. Are Millennials really that lonely?

So-Called Millennial

Recently a clever video went viral called The Innovention of Loneliness which illustrates some of the modern problems that have been introduced because of the Internet and technology. If you’re a millennial, most of what the video talks about will feel familiar, like the ability to “self-edit” and constantly be plugged-in to our communication platforms. Mark-Anthony Smith of Entitled Millennial wrote about his personal experience of growing up with social media starting with AOL Instant Messenger all the way back in 1998! His experience should also be very familiar to the average millennial. It correlated with my experience as well, and acknowledges that the internet (for good or ill) is an integral part of how millennials grew up.

I thought I would follow up by talking about the video, and some of my thoughts on the impact the internet has had on our ability to relate with each other.

The…

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Millennial Wedding Rituals: Nuptuals With A Social Media-Inspired Twist

I recently attending a wedding where my wife was performing a special selection of songs for the ceremony. It was a Cinderella-style event for one of her voice student's sisters and her college sweetheart husband. Ole Miss, to be exact. The only reason I know is because at some point during toast there was a … Continue reading Millennial Wedding Rituals: Nuptuals With A Social Media-Inspired Twist

Guest Post: Homelessness

Evidence of one generation’s intentions to make the world better: A Millennial perspective on homelessness with some sociocultural support. Great read!

So-Called Millennial

By Michelle Adams, Contributor

A man in the street begging for money, a women on the side of the road holding up a piece of cardboard saying “Homeless, Will Work for Food,” a family sleeping in their car, a tent city underneath a bridge—all these images represent homelessness.

Most people, millenials included, have certain stereotypes about homelessness. They view people who are homeless as lazy, dirty and mostly suffering from drug problems. Homelessness pervades all aspects of culture and every walk of life.

These views about homelessness were collected from teenage volunteers at South Oakland Shelter during Global Youth Service Day.

Some of these views are actually accurate views of homelessness, while some represent misconceptions throughout society. Many people view that homelessness can be easily solved by giving people money or food. Others believe that homeless people can attain jobs easily. If there are part time jobs available, why not…

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Millennial Soap Box: Global Poverty

it all starts with the desire to do something. Millennials have that despite feeling overwhelmed by the world’s problems. Here is one example.

So-Called Millennial

No one really likes a soap box, unless they’re the one standing on it. So I ask the reader to join me on the soap box, because there’s enough room for all of us.

In my last post, I talked about the pressure on millennials to find ever-elusive fulfillment. I have to say though, I’m actually very content and fulfilled with my life. But since I was a kid I’ve struggled horribly with boredom. Now, with a toddler, graphic design work, this blog, and friends nearby ready for park play dates at any moment, I’ve been able to keep this propensity toward restlessness in check quite nicely.

But, this morning as my son was eating breakfast, I felt an urge to sap some of my boredom so I grabbed my Kindle Fire and looked up Pinterest to see what was new as I finished up my coffee. Expecting to…

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Civic generations + Pressure

A generational cycles theory – inspired pop
culture perspective on how context may be similar but resulting behaviors perceived differently..

So-Called Millennial

MAD MEN DREAMS

I finally caught upon Mad Men the other day on Netflix, and sometimes when I watch an episode it’s at the front of my mind that, like millennials, the GI generation has been labeled a Civic generation by authors Neil Howe and William Strauss. The idea that millennials are categorized as the same archetype of Don Draper & friends is probably counter-intuitive to most millennials.

In an episode of Season 5, Don Draper attends a modern theater show called America Hurrah, and is offended when the play calls out the emptiness of consumerism. America Hurrah (NYDaily News) was “extremely controversial” at the time, and “helped usher in a breed of theater that was experimental, political and in-your-face,” according to Cynthia Harris, who was part of the original production.

Mad Men is today’s great social commentary that documents the slow unraveling of post-WWII culture. Aspirations of the age…

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From my perspective, this is not an accurate portrait of generational life stage value, but rather paints an almost ethnographic portrait of a naive and privileged subculture...especially when you throw in an ironic Instagram feed ( ironic because sometime soon the kids posting will realize their own misinformed douche-ness).