Lessons From Corporate America on Humanizing Poverty

I originally wrote the post below for my company (Culture) blog and also set it here on linkedin Hope you enjoy the inspiration. Last year we completed what ended up being an intensely inspiring project... Our client identified a customer group that they realized they hadn't been serving to their fullest potential because it is a “target” that they … Continue reading Lessons From Corporate America on Humanizing Poverty

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Guest Post: Homelessness

Evidence of one generation’s intentions to make the world better: A Millennial perspective on homelessness with some sociocultural support. Great read!

So-Called Millennial

By Michelle Adams, Contributor

A man in the street begging for money, a women on the side of the road holding up a piece of cardboard saying “Homeless, Will Work for Food,” a family sleeping in their car, a tent city underneath a bridge—all these images represent homelessness.

Most people, millenials included, have certain stereotypes about homelessness. They view people who are homeless as lazy, dirty and mostly suffering from drug problems. Homelessness pervades all aspects of culture and every walk of life.

These views about homelessness were collected from teenage volunteers at South Oakland Shelter during Global Youth Service Day.

Some of these views are actually accurate views of homelessness, while some represent misconceptions throughout society. Many people view that homelessness can be easily solved by giving people money or food. Others believe that homeless people can attain jobs easily. If there are part time jobs available, why not…

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Millennial Soap Box: Global Poverty

it all starts with the desire to do something. Millennials have that despite feeling overwhelmed by the world’s problems. Here is one example.

So-Called Millennial

No one really likes a soap box, unless they’re the one standing on it. So I ask the reader to join me on the soap box, because there’s enough room for all of us.

In my last post, I talked about the pressure on millennials to find ever-elusive fulfillment. I have to say though, I’m actually very content and fulfilled with my life. But since I was a kid I’ve struggled horribly with boredom. Now, with a toddler, graphic design work, this blog, and friends nearby ready for park play dates at any moment, I’ve been able to keep this propensity toward restlessness in check quite nicely.

But, this morning as my son was eating breakfast, I felt an urge to sap some of my boredom so I grabbed my Kindle Fire and looked up Pinterest to see what was new as I finished up my coffee. Expecting to…

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